30
May

Beautiful space photography

The lastest edition of PBS’s ‘Off Book' web series, which looks at the intersection of science and photography and its use as a tool to study space.

via Open Culture

28
May
28
May
28
May
Parasitic worms may regulate the human immune response
Parasitic worms (helminths) may have a role in evading the host immune response, while protecting the host from autoimmune disorders. The above image shows Trichuris trichiura eggs inside a female worm from an infected individual.

Parasitic worms may regulate the human immune response

Parasitic worms (helminths) may have a role in evading the host immune response, while protecting the host from autoimmune disorders. The above image shows Trichuris trichiura eggs inside a female worm from an infected individual.

28
May
Creating human faces from discarded DNA
Heather Dewey-Hagborg is an information artist whose work “seeks to question fundamental assumptions underpinning perceptions of human nature, technology and the environment”. 
From Twisted Sifter:

In her fascinating series entitled Stranger Visions, Heather collects DNA samples from discarded objects found on the street such as hair, nails, cigarette butts and chewing gum.
She then takes the samples to a DIY biology lab where she extracts the DNA and sequences the results. The sequence is then fed into a custom-built computer program that spits out a 3D model of a face which she then prints. The process and ideas behind such a provocative exploration are fascinating.

Creating human faces from discarded DNA

Heather Dewey-Hagborg is an information artist whose work “seeks to question fundamental assumptions underpinning perceptions of human nature, technology and the environment”. 

From Twisted Sifter:

In her fascinating series entitled Stranger Visions, Heather collects DNA samples from discarded objects found on the street such as hair, nails, cigarette butts and chewing gum.

She then takes the samples to a DIY biology lab where she extracts the DNA and sequences the results. The sequence is then fed into a custom-built computer program that spits out a 3D model of a face which she then prints. The process and ideas behind such a provocative exploration are fascinating.

26
May
25
May

Animated wire

From Colossal:

There are some fantastic sequences in this brief stop motion clip by Victor Haegelin of Patator Prod accompanied by music from Professor Kliq. Haegelin relies entirely on bent wire and paper to create everything you see and it’s amazing how fluid all the individual wire strands become when animated like this, wish it went a bit longer.

25
May
25
May

Flowers via nanotechnology

Researchers at Harvard have used nanotechnology to generate these ‘flowers’, which are roughly the width of “six red blood cells”. 

25
May
25
May

Street Fighter: Motion captured

Motion sculptures for every move from the video game, Street Fighter are surprisingly beautiful.

27
Aug

Check out these incredible launch photos from photojournalist Dan Winters

To witness a space shuttle launch is something that very few of us are (were) able to witness first-hand. Nevertheless, it’s comforting to know that photographers like Dan Winters were there to capture the vast beauty and immensity of lift-off for the rest of us.

From Time:

Dan Winters, who grew up during the golden age—the Cronkite Age—of space reporting, is one of the photographers who has mastered the craft best. His pictures can practically singe your eyebrows and set you squinting with their brilliance, while at the same time capturing the black smoke and deep clouds that are often the counterpoint to the fires of liftoff.

These three photographs are just three of many that are included in the upcoming compilation, Last Launch, by Dan Winters.

27
Aug
27
Aug
Anatomically correct lego
Somebody has gone to the trouble to ensure that lego remains anatomically correct. Or zombies.

Anatomically correct lego

Somebody has gone to the trouble to ensure that lego remains anatomically correct. Or zombies.

25
Aug

About This Blog

SCIENCE has explained nothing; the more we know the more fantastic the world becomes and the profounder the surrounding darkness.

Aldous Huxley, 1894-1963.

This blog resides firmly at the intersection of scientific research, education, art, and communication. Herein lies information and current happenings related to each, as well as any other sciencey goodness worth sharing.

About Me

Hi there, I'm Jim: PhD student in the biological sciences, enthusiast, friendly neighbor.

Contact Me

rationaldiscoveryblog@gmail.com

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